Just Qlik it: Electoral Gauge Chart

Hey everyone! Ready for another installment of our beloved section Just Qlik It? What? You forgot about that section? Well, for nearly two years so did I, but don’t worry, because it’s time to bring it back!

When I started this blog in 2014, I wrote a couple of posts under a category called Just Qlik It. These were supposed to be small recipes that everyone could just copy and paste in their apps. My idea was to contribute to your personal Qlik library (that messy file we all have where we store cool visualizations and useful chunks of code to reuse them later on). However, for some reason I forgot about that concept and kept going with other kind of posts… up until now!

Today’s snippet is a chart that you’ve seen a thousand times in the last few days: the electoral gauge chart. Even though it is really simple, its rectangular shape makes it very flexible when it comes to fitting into difficult spaces (you can make it wider or taller without impacting its aesthetics or functionality).

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It is also one of those noble visualizations that go well with almost any other object, just like a white collared shirt in your wardrobe (or so says my girlfriend). By mixing it with some images and text objects, it can become a great way to display the most relevant metrics in your dashboards.

As usual, you can download all the related files here or here, and the comment section is ready for your enquiries. On to the recipe!

Electoral Gauge Chart

1.- Create a new gauge chart. Don’t include any dimension and use a dummy expression like this: Continue reading

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Just Qlik it: Simple Maps

Today’s ‘Just Qlik it’ focuses on using simple maps in QlikView. I’ve been playing with this kind of objects in Qlik Sense recently and I thought it would be good to remember how we created these cartographic visualizations in the old days.

As the ancient masters taught us, before Qlik Sense, GeoQlik and custom extensions, there were scatter charts…

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Tutorial

An easy way to create maps in your applications is to exploit the Google API. As always, the reference material with all the examples is here.

1.- Paste the ‘Google Maps’ tab in your script

2.- Be sure to create the fields for Longitude and Latitude in your data model. If you don’t have this information, you can manually find it online (hahaha) or you can search it within your QV script with a routine like this one: Continue reading

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Just Qlik it: Double Gauge

‘Just Qlik it’ is a new section of our blog that focuses on sharing useful components… that kind of objects that are not incredibly complex, but are easy on the eye and convenient to have around.

On our first delivery, I’d like to share a double gauge that gets along pretty well with comparisons between ratios (for example, net and gross margins).

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You can easily copy, paste and configure this component by modifying the colors and formulas in the Presentation tab. Just remember that there are two independent gauges and that you should include your formula in the Lower Bound of the second segment.

You might also want to change the Min and Max values allowed. If your numbers are usually between 0% and 30% there’s no need for a gauge that goes all the way to 100%.

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[ Download File ]

I often use this kind of representation to highlight the main KPIs of the tab and reinforce them with a detailed table in the lower part of the screen. In the downloadable file, most of the objects are dummies created only to Continue reading